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Monthly Archives: January 2009

Łuczakosia versus reality, part 1

1) it was the end of travelers, aga was unhappy
2) she knew that from small baby girl she has to grow up to be a woman and take her life into her own hands
3) she has to break up with all of her strange boyfriends a) skiny artists b) strange Turks
4) she had a problem with it… she remember their eyes with a full of adoration (regardless of skin color)


5) she had to take care of earning money
6) parents started to push her: “go to work! you are old!”
7) Aga knew that she has to find a job: “I have great camera, I can take a photo and win WPP”, “I want to be like Horowitz”
8) but she didn’t have time to take a photographs because….
“Cheers, Cheers”
but the than… she saw herself as a a) tailor as b) a teacher, as c) a charwoman
But at the end she found a job as an archiwist, she earns money and does what she loves – photographs. What will be later? We will see… now, she has 1000000000000 *100000000 photographs of documents to take.

© Magda Sekuła

Tłumaczenie “ze słuchu” 😉 / translation of “the hearing” 😉

©Aga Łuczakowska

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“We are going to die, and that makes us the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born. The potential people who could have been here in my place but who will in fact never see the light of day outnumber the sand grains of Arabia. Certainly those unborn ghosts include greater poets than Keats, scientists greater than Newton. We know this because the set of possible people allowed by our DNA so massively exceeds the set of actual people. In the teeth of these stupefying odds it is you and I, in our ordinariness, that are here.”
— Richard Dawkins, excerpt from Chapter I, “The Anaesthetic of Familiarity,” of Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder (1998)